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Tuesday, 27 September 2011 01:27

Presentation by THAAT (The Hammer Active Alternative Transportation) – Oct 3 @6pm Featured

Written by  Sunil Angrish

Bikes at Work

For most North Americans, bicycles have for generations been regarded mainly as recreational or sporting equipment for the privileged and means to get around for those who can’t afford a car. This has had design impacts, related to both the types of bicycles being manufactured and sold and the environments designed for their use, as well as social, cultural, environmental and health impacts.

While the bicycle evolved into a vehicle as diversified and productive as the automobile elsewhere in the world, in North America it resulted in mainly two broad types of bike, especially after the 80s–the ubiquitous mountain bike and the road bike. While bikes were used to commute and haul stuff elsewhere, resulting in a variety of very sturdy, comfortable and heavy duty designs, in North America they became mainly lighter and faster. And there is hardly a cargo bike to be found.

But there is a renaissance under way. The bike is being reborn as a useful, productive vehicle to commute, to go out on the town, as a minivan to take the kids to school, daycare or the park, and to move goods, even whole households. This talk will explore the beginnings of this renaissance in North America

Monday, October 3rd at 6pm
27 King William Street, Hamilton, Ontario
FREE! Part of Edu-macation Mondays, sponsored by the Hamilton Centre for Teaching Peace
www.thaat.ca
www.edumacation.ca
www.peacecafe.ca

Last modified on Tuesday, 27 September 2011 02:31
Sunil Angrish

Sunil Angrish

Coordinator at the Hamilton Centre for Teaching Peace.

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