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Monday, 05 December 2011 22:37

Screening of: Life and Debt - Monday, Dec 19th @7pm

Written by  Sunil Angrish
Description
Life and Debt is a 2001 American documentary film directed by Stephanie Black. It examines the economic and social situation in Jamaica, and specifically the impact thereon of the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank's globalization policies. Its starting point is the award-winning non-fiction essay A Small Place by Jamaica Kincaid.

These loans were conditional on structural adjustment policies, which required Jamaica to enact harsh economic reforms, including trade liberalization, privatization, and deregulation. However, the reforms were unsuccessful and left the country with $4.6 billion dollars in debt. The film blames the World Bank and the IMF for causing this situation.

The film features a number of interviews with former Jamaican Prime Minister Michael Manley in which he critiques the system of International Financial Institution loans. He is particularly critical of required structural adjustments as an attack on the sovereignty of many former colonial nations and suggests the system is akin to imperialism or neocolonialism. Similar claims have been made popular by former Chief Economist of the World Bank (and Nobel Prize in Economics winner) Joseph Stiglitz. (source: wikipedia)

Followed by a casual discussion.
Donations suggested.
The film is on the second floor and unfortunately it's not accessible.

Part of Edumacation Mondays, brought to you by the Hamilton Centre for Teaching Peace
Sunil Angrish

Sunil Angrish

Coordinator at the Hamilton Centre for Teaching Peace.

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